1 Shekel of Tyros Coin Thought to be Judas' 30 Pieces of Silver 87S - B0713R5WNC

  • Model: B0713R5WNC
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  • Judas' 30 Pieces of Sier, Shekel of Tyros Coin, 126 B.C. to 57 A.D. (87-S) 25 mm, 6 g (larger than US Quarter 24 mm)

  • Obverse: Head of Melqart, the god of Tyre, aka Baal, aka Heracles. Reverse: Eagle inscribed with the legend “Tyre, the Holy and Inviolable,”

  • These are NOT ANCIENT COINS. They are made of the highest quality, Lead & Nickel Free Pewter and plated in real Gold or Antique Sier Finish. They are accurately detailed and have been molded from Museum Quality Reproductions.

  • See full description below Amazon Advertising under Description.

  • Shekels of Tyre were the only currency accepted at the Jerusalem Temple and are the most likely coinage with which Judas was paid for the betrayal of Christ. The sier shekels and half-shekels of Tyre were minted from c. 126 B.C. until c. 57 A.D. Any coin minted prior to 32 A.D. may have circulated in Jerusalem during Jesus' lifetime. When Rome conquered Judea in the first century B.C., they disallowed the minting of local currency. By Talmudic law the Temple tax had to be paid in coins of high purity sier, and the shekels of Tyre were the only ones that qualified. They left a lot to be desired in other religious respects, though. Tyre shekels had the head of Melqart, the god of Tyre, aka Baal, aka Heracles, on the obverse and an eagle on the reverse and were inscribed with the legend “Tyre, the Holy and Inviolable,” thus making mincemeat of the First Commandment prohibition against graven images of animals and deities. Since observant Jews would not carry coins bearing graven images and inscriptions calling Phoenician cities holy, and since the Temple would only accept Tyre shekels, a thriving market of money changers grew up in the Temple courtyards. Devout Jews would purchase Tyre shekels with non-blasphemous currency and pay their Temple tax with the purer sier. Those money changers charged exorbitant rates for this service, and according to the gospel of Matthew, it’s their tables an enraged Jesus overturned for making his Temple into a den of thieves.

    1 Shekel of Tyros Coin Thought to be Judas' 30 Pieces of Sier 87S - B0713R5WNC